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's the ultimate game of chicken. by the way, a new plan that works in taxing bank assets and even grabbing some money from the church. how about that. meanwhile, back here at home once again i'm going to stop this nonsense about a new national internet sales tax. my pal grover norquist will help me declare war on it. this is a big government tax grab that we will debate. >> speaking of taxes, guess who is not paying them? more and more federal workers are tax cheats. why shouldn't tax cheats just be fired? it's that easy on the "kudlow report." and we begin right now. first up tonight, the cyprus crisis continues. riots are forming in the streets. cnn's own chief international correspondent michelle caruso-cabrera is with us tonight. >> cyprus is going to do something that's called "resolving a bank." like all tough things in life, we use euphemisms. tonight the head of the central bank has asked parliament to give him permission to give him new powers of resolution authority. what he will do with that resolution authority is he will take cyprus's most troubled bank, he's going to take the good
of the cuts into taxes. but at any rate, we think early this week we'll have a clear sense of getting this done t. may have to go back to the house if the senate does amend it, and then the house i think would quickly pass it. host: stick with us real quick. senate majority whip dick durbin was on fox news sunday yesterday talking about the continuing spending resolution to keep the government funded and timing on what. i want to play that now. >> this is all very important, i understand, but we have work to be done in just a short period of time. i urge my senate colleagues, let's be sparing in the amends. let's get the c.r. passed. we can do it and do it quickly this coming week. host: before we let you go, if they don't get this done this week railroad company we thinking members may come back from recess next week before the 27th? is there any talk of that? guest: there's been nothing that i've heard, and i mean, i just wouldn't -- i wouldn't be too speaked by this. i think they will get it done early. i think they'll know by today, we'll be able to rough out a schedule after we h
is back, and the $13 billion bailout in cypress. they want to pay for it by taxing people's bank accounts. dagen: the president will announce his no , nominee for s secretary. another looks at a man's record over at the justice department. connell: the cyber threats, a new report according to an isp, nigeria as being the worst for spam. dagen: the corporate tax burden in the country. who pays the most? those stories and much more coming up in hour on "markets now." ♪ connell: markets are going back to positive. dagen: who has a greater connection than anyone in the building. connell: good morning, nicole. dagen: good morning, yes, my mother and father were born in cypress, but i want to look here at the averages, a lot stemming from what we heard in cypress, them giving a vote to tax the depositors there, and that, in turn, could really pressure europe overall, that vote takes place tomorrow. the banks closed until thursday. the euro is at a four month low, and people are spooked. i mean, that's really what's occurring here, down 45 points for the dow jones industrials, so that's down
shoppers, beware. you may get slapped with a new internet tax being handed down from capitol hill. that story, just ahead. >>> and later, giving new meaning to the term zombie economy. >> they see you as killers. they're training to attack. >> i'll tell you what, next time you see phillip, you tell him i'm going to take his other eye. >> the creator of "the walking dead," robert kirkman, attributes part of his show's success to the financial crisis. kirkman will join me later to explain. you're watching the "closing bell" on cnbc, first in business, worldwide. [ male announcer ] this is a reason to look twice. the stunning lexus es. get great values on your favorite lexus models during the command performance sales event. this is the pursuit of perfection. how do traders using technical analysis streamline their process? at fidelity, we do it by merging two tools into one. combining your customized charts with leading-edge analysis tools from recognia so you can quickly spot key trends and possible entry and exit points. we like this idea so much that we've applied for a patent. i
their proposals on taxes. under their budget, the top rate is to be reduced from 39.6% to 25%. the a.m.t. will be repealed. the corporate tax rate will be cut from 35% to 25%. but you don't find one sill bell in the republican budget on how these tax cuts will be paid for. . they don't identify a single tax policy that will end. the republican budget would mean a huge tax cut for the very wealthy, several $100,000 a year and leave a nearly $6 trillion hole in the deficit that would lead to tax increases for middle-income families. that isn't balance. that is total imbalance. at the same time, republicans propose cutting $3.3 trillion from programs for people with low and moderate incomes, including hundreds of billions of dollars for food nutrition and medicaid programs. so i want to end by asking the republicans when they come and talk about their tax proposals to name a specific that they would address. it's not in the republican budget. name one, name two, name three. otherwise, it's worse than empty. the chair: the time of the gentleman has expired. the gentleman from wisconsin.
that would be devastating for our families and the economy, dismantling medicare and ending up cutting taxes for the rich while raising them on the middle class. and not only that, but it did rely on gimmicks and tricks to hit that arbitrary date. there is nothing balanced about that kind of approach, and i'm very glad that every member of the senate had an opportunity to be clear about where we stand on that. mr. president, the senate also voted yesterday to specifically reject the idea that medicare should be dismantled or voucherrized. i'm glad we had strong bipartisan support on that amendment. we also voted clearly for the idea that while both sides favor closing tax loopholes and ending wasteful reductions that favored the wealthiest americans and biggest corporations, the senate thinks some of that revenue should be used to tackle the deficit and invest in the middle class, not be used just to simply cut tax rates for the rich the way that the house budget did. so, mr. president, we have a few more hours of debate this morning between now and 11:00, followed by some votes, and then we
as quickly as possible. now, we had the discussion earlier about taxes and we thought that we had worked the tax problem for and everybody preserved people's taxes for 99% of the people and we thought that there were going to be some spending cuts coming. somebody sent me this little chart that i have to share. this says "republican" on it. "okay, i'll raise taxes if you promise to cut spending." well, lucy, it's a "deal." but we've been watching this cartoon for years and years and we know what happens. when we go to pick up the spending cuts, the football suddenly gets lifted out of the way and we wind up on our back. the american public winds up on its back. that's not the kind of spending cuts we're looking for. we're looking for some real spending cuts. not just a decrease in the growth but some real spending cuts. and there's -- there's a way to do those. wyoming has been faced with probably an 8% in reduction in its income. how did it handle it? the governor, seeing that coming, got ahold of every department and program and said, i need a plan from you for how you would cut 2%, ho
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it to the rich. let's raise taxes trillions of dollars. let's go and stick it to special interests like people who he provide gasoline at the pump. to raise taxes on oil companies. ladies and gentlemen, every time you raise taxes, you raise prices. and every time you race -- raise prices the consumer has to pay more for it. these are the ideas that make america less able to be prepared for its future and cost more money. that's why when you look at this slide you see where the laws already enacted by the democrats are leading america to where we will be functionally bankrupt. we are following theure peaian model exactly what -- the european model exactly what they have done over there for a number of years and now we are seeing firsthand, iceland, greece, cyprus just yesterday. this is the pathway that if our friends, the democrats, get their say, this is where they'll lead us. so republicans through paul ryan spoke about we want to make sure that medicare, social security, that the free enterprise system is alive and well by making these plans and the process therein ready for the employers a
of bankustomers are blowing their talk, with talk of a 10% tax on deposit the money, has a lot of angry customers storming the atm machines but the government has closed banks to avid a bank run, a keeping them close until they sort this out, but the tax is till coming. for cyprus it is about the cost of staying in the euro club, never mind how average i citizes there are getting club. but this is about taxing assets there. something with which we should all be very familiar here. no uncle sam has not hacked into our bank accounts -- yet, but he made a b-line for our other assets like next time we try to sell our home, and obamacare wants 3.8% of the profit for medicare tax. juss like it is tacking medical devices for what it deems exception atrogen -- generous healthy insurance policy. so what is such a big leap going from hitting you up for dollars off fur devices, and hitting you up for dollars off your deposits. none, i tell you cyprus is not isolated. i am telling you, cyprus is a test case, it is starting, it was not only liberal the world over watching. now big brother, everywhere salivati
taxes and pay cuts, instead what they did was they taxed bank deposits. they're calling it a tax. a lot of folks are calling it a seizure. here's what's significant. even small depositors below the insurance threshold are going to get hit. the original number for small depositors below 100,000 euros was 6.5%. they're working in parliament right now about shifting that and any other subsequent plan suggests that if you have insured money it will still get hit. what did we see over the week whend this announcement happened on yesterday? runs on the atms at the banks in cypress because they'd shut down the banks as a result of this. they stopped all wire transfers and you also if you tried to take money out they had partitioned out the amount of money that you were supposed to be giveing to the government each though there hasn't been a vote in parliament. why did cypress need a bailout? its banks are bust. the reason the banks in sicypru they bet the greek debt would not be restructured but it was. that's left a lot of them insolvent. the banks in cyprus are huge, eight times the size of
from cyprus and concern about deposits being taxed obviously set off worries on wall street abroad and here at home obviously. sandra: opposite end of the spectrum, jcpenney, the retailers, jcpenney a huge rally today, nicole? >> a couple of reasons. isi group talking about the fact that they might turn into a reit-like entity. oppenheimer talking postively about jcpenney. david: apple, apple, even though the market came down i think apple stayed up about 12 bucks. why are they doing so well on the eve the samsung announcement? >> that is pretty amazing. once the news was out about samsung it took away some uncertainty. apple bucked the trend. sandra: best buy seeing a nice top. that was an up stock on a down day. >> best buy, the last quarter was a great one. they got positive analyst comments as well. jpmorgan initiated coverage with overweight rating. [closing bell rings] david: the bells are ringing. we're not at absolutely postively lowest point of the markets but very close to it as we see a down market. dow jones industrials down 61 points on the beginning of this trading we
on this rich guys did not dodge the tax. now a government has broken precedence, by going after what is in their bank account, how long do you think it will be before governments start sniffing around your bank account. frankly, i believe it's not long. think this country, when first federal income tax was just to blender efforts of world war i but it stuck around. or europe. expanded. what started out as a 4% tax for millionaires is now north of 20%, and en snaring, well, everyone. that is what concerns me about this cyprus tax. what the poor saps will discover when the banks reopen in cyprus, run. can't take their money and the government is watching and limiting, and i am kind of worrying. what is going on in this island nation, is a tsunami. bank on it. literally. to rich edison, in cyprus to this nervous night before, hey, rich. >> good evening neil, you have to imagine, folks without access to their banks account will have some tomorrow 8:30 in the morning. for more than a week these folks had closed banks today there was a bit of a lull, in fact that banks were closed not beca
of dollars of emergency crash and creditors impose onetime tax of 3% on all bank deposits under $130,000. >> going deep here. >> the tax could be closer to 10% on people who have over $640,000 in the bank. that's according to the "the wall street journal" this morning. people stood in long lines over the weekend to withdraw money before the policy went into effect and now russian president vladimir putin is calling the move, quote, unfair, unprofessional and dangerous. russian citizens make up the majority of billions of euros held in cypress bank. this is important. >> cypress. >> who cares about cyprus? >> come on, cyprus. are you telling me if somebody sneezes in cyprus we get a cold than on the nasdaq? >> tell us why. >> we have a cold on the nasdaq. the nasdaq is going down today. not too many people care about cyprus but a way the europeans have screwed up the bailout by getting the people to pay a part of the cost. you could have a run on the bank and europeans say why do i have my money in this bank? might be a tax on me next. it shows that europe is still a mess, that they h
now, speaking of cyprus, the idea of confiscating people's income after already been taxed sent a chill far beyond cypress. could that happen here? that is question we ask steve forbes, fox chairman and editor-in-chief. he has thoughts on that you don't want to miss coming up on the "countdown to the closing bell" -- "after the bell" [ male announcer ] at his current pace, bob will retire when he's 153, which would be fine if bob were a vampire. but he's not. ♪ he's an architect with two kids and a mortgage. luckily, he found someone who gave him a fresh perspective on hisortfolio. and with some planning and effort, hopefully bob can retire at a more appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. all stations come over to mithis is for real this time. step seven point two one two. rify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. ♪
this week. spending cuts stay in place many pet projects no longer on the table. big tax hikes gone. dare we say republicans win? with that as the back drop stocks open a little higher today and gold will be lower. "varney & company," yeah, about to begin. ct shouting ] ♪ [ indistinct shouting ] [ male announcer ] time and sales data. split-send stats. [ indistinct shouting ] ♪ it's so close to the options for... [ indistinct shouting, bell dinging ] ...you'll bust your brain box. ♪ all onhinkorswim from td ameritrade. ♪ from td ameritrade. a brand new start. your chance to rise and shine. with centurylink as your trusted technology partner, you can do just that. with our visionary cloud infrastructure, global broadband network and custom communications solutions, your business is more reliable - secure - agile. and with responsive, dedicated support, we help you shine everday of the week. >> it is monday, march 25th, cyprus gets its bailout. but the country's in financial chaos and faces an economic depression. in short, here is what's happened. angela merkel wins, the germans win
because of that deposit tax component. now, the president is currently meeting with the leaders of the political parties. of course, what he's trying to do is to strong arm and to persuade them into voting for that deal because the other alternative, yes, that is bankruptcy for this country, which has only 1 million people and only makes up 0.2% of the entire eurozone. the debate and the vote on that bailout deal will be kicking off in around four hours from now at 4:00 p.m. local time. thou, a lot of uncertainty as to what the outcome of the vote will be, given that nobody has a clear majority. having said that, there is, of course, the chance that some of the lawmakers who have been wavering could have been appeased by the talk that some of the taxes for the smallest depositors could be lowered. now, "the wall street journal" has reported that those deposits between zero is and 100,000 euros could be taxed at only 3% as opposed to 6.75% previously. now, the middle bracket would be 100,000 to 500,000 euros. that could be taxed at 10% and then anything in excess of half a millio
is not just a tax haven for russia, it is the tax haven for russian millionaires and billionaires. russia has invested $119 billion, that's with a "brks" in cyprus in 2011 alone. that's by far the largest recipient of russian investments in the world. equal amount of investment came back to russia from cyprus. funny how that works. russian investment is five times the total economic output for cyprus. russians account for $20 billion of total bank deposits or, tyler, as you mentioned, more than a third among the top russians in cyprus is the fert cider magnet now the biggest shareholder in the bank of cyprus. he has a lot of money in u.s. real estate as well. he brought donald trump's mansion and his daughter bout an apartment in sandy well. and alexander bought avraz steel. the mystery to me is why these wealthy russians kept so much money in cyprus when they knew the banks were in trouble. one reason is that there are fewer choices. if you look around the world, governments arie cracking down n tax evasion and money laundering. they're all complying with global capitalist. even with this 10
melissa: welcome. i'm melissa francis. lori: i'm lori i i rothman. voting to delay a tax on the bailout, and now there's reports the finance minister is stepping down. we have reaction with the trading president, the former cypress trade representative to the u.s.. he'll be joining us. >> treasury secretary jack lew meeting with the chinese president on the agenda of growing concerns about china ease role in cyber attacks. melissa: targeting seg represents in new york a week after a judge rejected the ban on large drinks. we get the verdict with the judge andrew going after soda, ear buds, cigarettes, what's next? seriously. lori: only can guess. it is back down to the floor, new hour here on "markets now," and i know cypress is driving action again today. >> it is. we are seeing headlines that the president will be talking with angela merkel, obviously, another development pertaining to what we see in cypress, which then, obviously, really rules the e.u. markets and our markets here at home. yesterday, for example, we lost a lot of money in the global market with all the
.85 trillion, half through spending cuts and half through tax hikes. the republican plan, paul ryan plan, would cut the deficit $4.6 trillion in ten years and includes repealing obamacare. the hope going through the legislative process they might be able to find compromise to strike some sort of deal. >> we need to put americans back to work. that's our first priority. deficit reduction i would put as the second priority and one that is coupled with economic growth the so i think we can do both. make sure we have deficit reduction but don't cut too much too fast. >> reporter: bottom line, bill, american people are seeing this over and over again. republicans and democrats fighting on both sides of the aisle and perhaps, they can come together for a grand bargain but just doesn't appear to be the case right now. as they grapple with the budget, keep in mind that two weeks away they have to come up with a continuing resolution by march 27. bill: as ryan says, at least there is baseline for comparison between the two sides. we'll get into that in just a moment here. thank you, kelly wright on the
to be? the monopoly man smoking a cigar? let's take a look at the euro. parliament voting to tax -- to not tax bank deposits. that's the latest word. a very fluid situation. much more on "closing bell" next. >> thanks very much for watching "street signs." stick with us. see you at the same time tomorrow. >>> hi, everybody. good afternoon. welcome to the "closing bell." i'm maria bartiromo at the new york stock exchange. the dow and the s&p 500 threatening to do something we haven't done all year. decline for three days in a row. >> shall we panic? i don't know what to do. i'm bill griffeth. stocks are lower. they've been lower all day. we've had just in the last few minutes here, to see if parliament rejected that one-time tax on bank deposits, which was a condition of its bailout plan. now investors are concerned maybe a default by cypress could intensify the euro zone's debt crisis. >> morgan stanley's adam parker, who had been negative says, no, no, no, i'm going to raise targets. in fact, one of the biggest bears turning bullish. why this market still has plenty of room to r
now that they are working on does nothing more than raise taxes. they want more of your money, more money out of your paycheck. ask yourself does washington really need more of your money? we are $16 trillion in debt. we have deficits we can't even wrap our arms around, and they want more of your money. if you were a financial advisor that put you $1 million in debt and ripped through your college savings for your children and all of your checking account and said, just give me more money and we'll solve the problem, would you do it? absolutely not. more than jobs, though, we are also working to save medicare and social security, the commitments that we have made to the american people. so let's take a look here at the big picture. here's a budget breakdown of where we are at right now. look, your eyes are glazed over and we start talking about the trillions of dollars that we spend, but let's take a look at what you pay versus what you expect. this big blue part right here? that's on auto pilot. no adults have come to the table to talk about where we are at today and how to actuall
a silicon valley insider and former yahoo coo daniel rosenzweig on the push for the sales tax. what impact will that have on retailers? you'll want to hear his answer this morning and first, why dollar general can make some sense for your portfolio and take one more look at futures this morning. looking at a pretty decent open for a short workweek this day as we have good friday off here. live from squawk on the street from post 9 when we return. your big picture. but e with the fidelity guided portfolio summary, you choose which accounts to track and use fidelity's analytics to spot trends, gain insights, and figure out what you want to do next. all in one place. i'm meredith stoddard and i helped create the fidelity guided portfolio summary. it's one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account. >>> shares of dollar general rising in pre-market tradex clueding items that yrms 97 cents a share, beating wall street forecasts and revenues essentially in line with the company benefiting from increased food sales and jimmy,
taxes taken out of the pockets of hardworking american families, more government spending which adds to the trillions of dollars in debt that will be handed down to the next generation. our friends on the other side of the aisle talk about a balanced approach, but they refuse to even balance their own budget. our vision calls for a stop to washington's failed policies and reckless spending. it says american families and small businesses understand you can't spend more than you take in. you need to balance your budget, and it's time for washington to do the same. this vision seeks to protect the things that we value most, to keep the promises we made to our seniors, to our veterans. i'm the son of a u.s. marine. while at the same time allowing us to leave a better future for our kids and our grandkids, that's the vision i want to work toward and that's why i'm proud to support the house budget committee's proposal which we'll be voting on later this week. this isn't about passing a budget for one year, just one time. this is about creating lasting solutions that help grow our economy
trade that stuff and make money off of it if you buy enough quantity. it is triple tax-free. anything related to california, municipalities, people are buying them. they are buying them at discount and they are trading them. they are clipping the coupons. do they hold them until maturity? maybe not. here is one more, yankee stadium that that was issued to basically build the garage, again, buying with pennies on the dollar. you do not necessarily hold it until maturity. this is a trade. trade detail risk. big risk here. you can make some money. >> i will follow your advice and not go into this market. california, basketcase when it comes to taxes. it seems too low if they are trading at pennies on the dollar. charlie: it is the real distress stuff like this west virginia tobacco bonds. why aren't the tobacco bonds distressed? when you raise taxes, people will not smoke. they will not pay the taxes. as a trade, you can make some money. jon corzine rolled the dice with short term, i it was italian bonds and spanish bonds. his dad turned out money good. people lost confidence in his abil
will have to come along with tax increases. this deal still hurts. >> i do not think there is any denying that the cyprus people will have to go through tough times and will suffer the consequences. we had to adjust over relatively a short period of time. rich: now the question is what does this mean for the rest of the euro zone? this, the bailout should be a template for the rest of europe and banks should be reduced. back to you. connell: rich edson lives in cyprus. trading halted in some of those italian banking stocks also added the comments in terms of a template. time to bring in axel merck. your thoughts? >> good morning. when someone screams fire, you do not want to shut the accident. halting stocks, i do not think, is helpful at all. i think it is rather responsible. the question is what will happen. obviously, investors are taking action. connell: you just look at the big board here in the united states and the green at the beginning of the day has now turned red. european markets losing some steam. you talk about the italian banks and how it would not be a good idea to halt th
meltdown. the parliament rejected an unprecedented tax on bank deposits. that was a key part of the eu bailout terms. the finance minister is in moscow today with mounting speculation that russia could step in with a safety plan to safeguard russian deposits in cyprus. steve sedgwick is in moscow where he caught up with the finance minister there an hour or so ago. steve? >> they turned to russians once again. there's a loan on the table from russians dating back from 2011 so it's not the exception to it the rule for the cypriots to turn to the russians. the russians themselves are indignant they weren't brought into talks. let's hear what he had to say earlier on about the state of the current talks. >> first meeting very constructive. very honest discussion. we underscored how difficult the situation is and we'll now continue our discussions to find a solution by which we hope we will get some support from russia. >> in terms of that support, are we talking about a change of terms for the current existing 2.5 billion euro loan and an extension of 5 billion loan in addition to that? >
realistically think it's going away any time soon? the republican fantasy budget reduces taxes dramatically without a hint of how it would be possible. without exploding the deficit or dramatically raising taxes on the middle class. this is consistent with what the romney ryan ticket said on the campaign trail last fall. the same issue where they dodged, assembled, and ignored the perfectly reasonable question how is it possible? six months later it's back in the budget but there's still -- but there still is no answer. during the last 40 years there have been only four budgets without deficits. the last three clinton budgets and the one that george bush inherited from bill clinton. in each case taxes as a percentage of the total economy were over 20%. in this republican fantasy land budgets are balanced with revenues at 19% of the economy, yet meeting the needs of 78 million more seniors and a infrastructure deficit that is growing as america is falling apart. clearly this is not remotely possible if we are going to enjoy anything like our current quality of life. there is a real world int
to kick out cypress? >> anything is possible. you know, i think the outrage over this deposit tax is about the honesty of the approach. if you think about it, citizens around the world suffer from that tax. in the united states, how long have we had 0 #% interest rates in the united states? how much money have savers lost who keep money in the bank because they have not received interest on deposits all these years? what about prices? because the federal reserve does quantitative easing, food prices go up, gas prices up, and deposits lose value. at least with the tax in cypress, it was more honest. the government up front saying we're going to take your money. we're doing it secretly, and i think the honest approach is better. shibani: they make parallels in cypress, and what you mentioned happens here in the u.s., but the levy on bank deposits, this is what is causing a storm, and it's really getting people upset. are you concerned about any kind of precedence this could bring into the industry into europe and what it could do to banking confidence as a whole because when you start to hav
.d.p. which is what they're now perhaps going to get. by taxing depositors, they actually have the ability to also tax nonresidents, as we saw in your clip just now. there's a lot of british there but there are even more russian depositors so in that sense you actually end up having the ability to bring in tax revenue from non-cyprusians. that's a big advantage for the government of cyprus because this is money that otherwise they would have had to raise by cutting pensions or other types of austerity measures. >> woodruff: the russians and others stand to be hurt pretty badly by this. >> basically that's part of the strategy or the intent of both the euro area, the i.m.f. and the cyprusian government. >> woodruff: but the signal that sends, i mean, what's the message it sends to the rest of europe? i mean, how worried should they be that what's going on in cyprus and we don't know how this is going to play out because the banks are closed for the next few days. how worried should the rest of the banks in europe be? >> i don't think there's an immediate risk of sort of contagious bank run
going to go back to the original plan of taxing deposits. i am toll that's not going to be submitted to the troika. that may be the pipe dream of some in parliament. ladies and gentlemen, back to you. >> thanks, michelle. i was looking at the european bourses and i mean, if they can't sell off on this, and it's on -- you know, it's 0.2% of their economy and, you know, we're worried about whether there's any ripple all the way over to us. >> it may want be an instant market reaction, though. it may be something that's more of a concern about whether there would be other countries that step out of the eu. >> don't you think the markets could anticipate whether there would be further trouble or not? >> i don't know. i think this is -- >> we would be seeing it if it was really -- if they he can't sell off in europe, we shouldn't be looking at it at all for our markets here. >> no. michelle, what's that? >> i know you're over there, but you don't care. >> the one ripple effect i can think of is -- the one ripple effect i can think of is that if when they wind down this bank, there's some
tax that helps bankroll the law. stuart varney, anchor of "varney & company" on the fox who upwards 40 million people will be paying a whole lot more for their individual coverage after obamacare takes full effect next year. in some cases, the premiums that we will pay will double. remember this is a 17,000 page list of rules for obamacare. it takes full effect next year, january the 1st, and already you can see a great deal of dissent on how to pay for it and what it's actually going to cost and there is real, real concern here, that it won't be implemented properly on time. heather: yeah. all those exchanges. 33 different states, not forming them on their own. >> that's right. heather: thanks so much, stu. we appreciate it. we'll talk a little bit more about it with our political panel later. bill: what do you do with this now? you were counting on this revenue to pay for other aspects of the law. where do you find the money. heather: there are 20 new taxes included to pay for it. bill: we're just getting started. chinese former nasa contractor under suspicion of stealing u.s. secret
to affects our banking system. they had that choice. either that country defaults or they tax the banks and it is the russian money that is in there. >> let's say you have money in the caymen islands. >> oh, i do, greg. >> you probably do. and then all of a sudden the caymen islands decides they will take your money. isn't that an act of war? >> are you a dope for doing it. qaddafi did that. all of those people had the money. the libyan banks and qaddafi and your choice is to poke them in the chest and say give it back and he said no. that's the risk you take. you save on taxes and you put it in other countries, the risk is they will take your money. >> something out of this story that can anger people. given what happened in greece and cypress couldn't this happen to us in america? >> this could not happen to us in america. the idea it is russian money isn't true. it is a higher rate for those over100,000 euros. they are putting like 50,000 euros in cypress. the whole thing is enraging especially because the first story of i -- the first story i read,. >> i mean, my argument is it can
union leaders called for a tax on savings accounts, prompting a drop in global stocks. >. it's outright theft. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown kicks off a week of stories about the middle east, starting with israel's new governing coalition sworn into office today. >> ifill: paul solman reports on older workers in academic institutions, professors in the classroom long past age 65. >> am i keeping track of jobs? yes. that's okay. as long as i'm a good teacher, that's what's important. >> woodruff: and we examine the republican national committee's call for a new direction for the g.o.p., a road map hoping for a rebound in 2016 and beyond. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation
taxes on the wealthy, put through a payroll tax increase, entitlements. we've got two out of three going. we had the president and congress raising taxes on the wealthy. i don't think bernanke wants to be the fed of 1937 because the recession came back aggressively and it was only world war ii that made the hiring come back. he doesn't want to be the guy -- he'd rather be second-guessed by all the bears who come on and say he's got to tighten because my short positions aren't making any money. he's not responding to the people who are short. he's actually responding to the american people. old-fashioned kind of guy. >> in terms of the reaction in the markets after the ben bernanke news conference, was that surprising at all that, for whatever reason, for whatever he said, the markets managed to rise and actually reached the highs of the day afterwards? >> i think there were a lot of people who expected that he would put in some language that just says, we're not going to keep rates low indefinitely because we see real estate, affordability is fantastic. you pick up the front page of the
's a tax. so theoretically, authorities have the authority to actually collect taxes on whatever. except it is being perceived as an ex appropriation of the savings. so -- but this is cypriot. this is a cyprus problem. don't extend it to the euro. the euro is not in danger because of what's happening in cyprus. nothing is going to happen to the financial system of the world because of what's happening in cyprus. we haven't had very enlightened series of decisions. since greece. and then we've bumbled a little bit, we've tumbled and is bumbled with spain and italy and now this cypriot thing is going to need a better design. >> so what is the design? what's the reasonable solution? >> well, one of the things is you don't have to affect the people who are below a certain threshold. now they're thinking about 20,000 or 50,000, whatever the threshold is. the conventional threshold used to be 100,000, but it doesn't have to be the case. the question is here. you really have to, you know, critters of the financial system have to take losses. you cannot make it a point. and this is the biggest m
in the bank will be taxed on them. under $130,000 it's a 6.75%, over $130,000 a 9% tax. and of course this is going to hit ordinary depositors, moms and pops, poor businesses, anybody who's got a bank account in cyprus is going to have to pay this tax. and it changes a fundamental principle of all bailouts so far. it is hitting the small people, the private investor, the private depositor. >> look at the other countries that have been bailed out. greece as a prime example where wages and retirement was slashed by more than these people are going to pay, which is a -- >> no, no, no. no, michael, it's not -- in cyprus case it's not an either or all, it's going to be a both. not only are they going to face this tax to help make up a shortfall, they're also going to have spending cuts and the government cutbacks, they're also going to have the recession that follows on as they try and make the economy back on track. this was done because some european countries believed to be the fins and germans and other northern european countries wanted to make sure they were not seen as bailing out r
price. tracy: have you felt the impact of the rising payroll tax? some people say, no, i am not one of them. we have a surprising result of a new survey ahead. former nfl grbac and winery owner group bledsoe is here and is lobbying efforts to allow direct wine sales. ashley: let's take a look at battles as we had to the break. the dollar increasing in value. gold moving lower as a result. we will be right back. ♪ it's monday. a brand new start. your chance to rise and shine. with centurylink as your trusted technology partner, you can do just that. with our visionary cloud infrastructure, global broadband network and custom communications solutions, your business is more reliable - secure - agile. and with responsive, dedicated support, we help you shine every daof the week. gives you 1% cash back on all purchases, plus a 50% annual bonus. and everyone but her... no. no! no. ...likes 50% more cash. but i don't give up easy... do you want 50% more cash? yes! yes?! ♪ [ male announcer ] the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on every purchase, plus a 50% annual bo
,000 in the bank entirely to those under 100,000 and to keep the tax at 9.9% for those above 100,000 euros in their accounts. if it doesn't sound much different from the original plan, it's not. it basically exempts those with less than 20,000. on the back of that, we did see markets weak. elsewhere, there has been a weakening, but realively contained one. the ftse mib in italy is down 0.3%. the xetra dax is down by 0.5%. france is weaker. the ftse, as well, down about 0.25%. not too far off the levels we've seen this morning. german economic sentiment did come in roughly in line with expectations, so that helps to keep the bid in the euro, as well. here is the different between spain and italy. italy's ten-year selling off a bit. yield up to 4.66%. spain rallying. it did go to market with three nine-month yields this morning. still below 5%. i mentioned what was happening with the euro. let's take a look now as it continues to go through the different pieces of economic data we're getting this morning. it's still down about 0.11%. yesterday, it was actually stronger. so markets generally
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of tax money on himself. is that true? factor is coming right back. my wife takes centrum silver. i've been on the fence about it. then i read an article about a study that looked at the long term health benefits of taking multivitamins. they used centrum silver for the study... so i guess my wife was right. [ male announcer ] centrum. always your most complete. >> bill: earlier this week 8 marines were killed. seven others injured. senator reid from that state quickly exploited the issue angering the marine corps. >> this sequester should go away. we have cut already huge amounts of money and deficit reduction. it's just not appropriate, mr. president. that our military can't train and do the maintenance necessary. these men and women our marines were training there in hawthorne and with the sequester it's going to cut the stuff back. >> can i tell you marine corps officials this afternoon are taking a strong exception to what harry reid implied, saying that this exercise, for example, was planned well in advance had nothing to do with the bucket -- budget cuts, there were no corne
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